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Dashboard Removal Tips
#1
Hi all,

I shall soon be attempting to replace the leaking heater matrix on my Mk1 02 Berlingo Multispace 1.9D which as most of you know involves removing the entire dashboard. At the moment it seems like a daunting task but I can't afford to take it to a garage and get ripped off so DIY it is!

Can anybody offer me some advice as to the best approach? Currently all my dashboard lights and clocks work as they should so I'd really like that to be the case when I put it all back together.
I think I read somewhere that after removing the negative cable from the battery I should wait about 30 mins before disconnecting multi-plugs behind the dash, something to do with the BSI. Is this necessary?
Any tips or help will be greatly appreciated!
Thanks
Paul
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#2
After locking the car (with bonnet up), wait a few minutes for the BSI to doze off before you uncouple the battery. Then go for it.

Most connectors are colour coded in such a way that you can't get reassembly wrong.

That said, a lot of the dash can be removed before you get to the clocks. Cubbyholes, dash surround, radio, column shroud. Don't forget the console, too. You can drive the car with much stripped out, if the process needs to be stretched over several days or a week.

I remove the whole column as a matter of course. It simplifies access and dash pad removal. Don't forget to keylock so it doesn't spin and bugger up your clockspring connector.
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#3
(13-05-2013, 01:32 AM)addo Wrote:  After locking the car (with bonnet up), wait a few minutes for the BSI to doze off before you uncouple the battery. Then go for it.

Most connectors are colour coded in such a way that you can't get reassembly wrong.

That said, a lot of the dash can be removed before you get to the clocks. Cubbyholes, dash surround, radio, column shroud. Don't forget the console, too. You can drive the car with much stripped out, if the process needs to be stretched over several days or a week.

I remove the whole column as a matter of course. It simplifies access and dash pad removal. Don't forget to keylock so it doesn't spin and bugger up your clockspring connector.

Thanks Addo,
This is all very useful to know especially the bit about being able to drive the car with a lot stripped out.

There are a couple of things I didn't really understand.
1) Locking car with bonnet up -- I don't have central locking on my Mk 1 and anyway none of my locks work at the moment.
2) 'Don't forget to keylock so it doesn't spin and bugger up your clockspring connector.' -- I don't really understand this , sorry! Could you explain in layman's terms please.

Thanks again for your help.
Paul
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#4
Your car is a 2001, so it has a BSI instead of the earlier fuse panel. If you cause the BSI to chuck its toys out the pram by disconnecting before its gone to sleep (ie; no electrical operations such as windows, locking, interior lights, ignition, radio etc etc for 15+ minutes), it can make restarting the car problematic after a lot of unplugging/replugging of bits.

With the steering column, you remove it with the wheel attached still - it's decoupled near where it passes through the floor. But if you have the key in the ignition lock the wheel can spin "freely" and it will damage the fine spiral wound wire connector that carries a signal to fire the airbag, and controls the horn. So, once you have the column all loose and ready to extract, you pull out the ignition key, give the wheel a slight wiggle to activate the steering lock and then remove in the locked position.

Here's how I drove my Xantia for a week last year. No blower, no AC, clocks balanced on the steering column bracket. :whistle:

[Image: bareessentials.jpg]
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#5
(13-05-2013, 09:27 AM)addo Wrote:  Your car is a 2001, so it has a BSI instead of the earlier fuse panel. If you cause the BSI to chuck its toys out the pram by disconnecting before its gone to sleep (ie; no electrical operations such as windows, locking, interior lights, ignition, radio etc etc for 15+ minutes), it can make restarting the car problematic after a lot of unplugging/replugging of bits.

With the steering column, you remove it with the wheel attached still - it's decoupled near where it passes through the floor. But if you have the key in the ignition lock the wheel can spin "freely" and it will damage the fine spiral wound wire connector that carries a signal to fire the airbag, and controls the horn. So, once you have the column all loose and ready to extract, you pull out the ignition key, give the wheel a slight wiggle to activate the steering lock and then remove in the locked position.

Here's how I drove my Xantia for a week last year. No blower, no AC, clocks balanced on the steering column bracket. :whistle:

[Image: bareessentials.jpg]

Ah, now I understand. I was just confused with the term 'keylock' which I know as 'steering wheel lock'.

So does this sequence sound okay?

1) Switch everything off and open bonnet
2) Leave car standing for 15mins +
3) Disconnect battery negative cable
4) Start dismantling dashboard and remove steering column once steering lock is engaged.

Presumably once the BSI unit has gone to sleep it won't remember anything about the operation when the battery is finally reconnected.

Love the picture, very Mad Max! Is it legal to drive it like this?
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#6
Answer to your last question? Hell no!

You are right about the BSI; it won't have any knowledge of what you get up to after the negative terminal is removed.

Even if you do need to use the car incomplete, the main items I suggest reconnecting before you repower are the clocks, everything on the column, brake/clutch pedal and handbrake switches as fitted, and the blower harness connectors. It'll generate minor fault codes but won't refuse to get up and go.
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#7
(13-05-2013, 11:05 AM)addo Wrote:  Answer to your last question? Hell no!

You are right about the BSI; it won't have any knowledge of what you get up to after the negative terminal is removed.

Even if you do need to use the car incomplete, the main items I suggest reconnecting before you repower are the clocks, everything on the column, brake/clutch pedal and handbrake switches as fitted, and the blower harness connectors. It'll generate minor fault codes but won't refuse to get up and go.

Thanks again for all your advice Addo. Who would've thought I could get help like this from somebody on the other side of the world from me! This is a great forum!
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