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spare tyre trauma
#1
last week hit a pot hole on a country road and blew out a tyre instantly. That however was only the start of the problem....it was muddy, it was raining, had the whole family onboard...and then the spare wheel wouldn't drop down because the screw thread was TOTALLY RUSTED!!! I had to use brute force and ignorance to bend the hook over to drop the wheel and then tie it back up with string temporarily. Its all now fixed, but my point is, while its dry and sunny and you have a spare moment (not much hope of that then) check your spare tyre will lower and grease the thread up cos you never know when you'll need it!
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#2
Good advice indeed. I do that about every year after someone else posted about a rusted bolt.
2010 Berlingo Multispace HDi 110 with FAP.  Persamos green.

[Image: ab197646.gif]
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#3
Took mine out and greased it a couple of months ago. The previous owner had done it but it did need doing again. What an.awful tool Citizen provide to lower the spare though! Even though the bolt on mine was quite free it was still a pain in the worst. I don't know what the thread is but I'm very tempted to make up something with a hex head. At least I could use a socket then....
'56 Multispace 1.6HDi - Iron Grey
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#4
(09-07-2012, 12:50 PM)3rensho Wrote:  Good advice indeed. I do that about every year after someone else posted about a rusted bolt.

Same here because the BX had exactly the same system and was prone to exactly the same faults. You'd think after 20 years or so they'd get it right!:brickwall:
Malc

Stupid computer!
Security system should not fail safe!
Security system should fail dangerous!
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#5
(09-07-2012, 01:13 PM)pidgeonpost Wrote:  Took mine out and greased it a couple of months ago. The previous owner had done it but it did need doing again. What an.awful tool Citizen provide to lower the spare though! Even though the bolt on mine was quite free it was still a pain in the worst. I don't know what the thread is but I'm very tempted to make up something with a hex head. At least I could use a socket then....

...please excuse the typos - predictive text got the better of me...
'56 Multispace 1.6HDi - Iron Grey
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#6
Not a solution for everyone, but...
I removed the spare wheel AND carrier (just lifts out when spare wheel removed, a 10sec job and can be replaced as easily when required) because;
1. The reason in the original thread.
2. Gets covered in road dirt, etc.
3. Difficult to check pressure.
4. Not easy to see tyre condition.
The spare is now clean and dry and sits in the back of my van in its own cover. It is bungeed down for safety reasons.
I am fortunate not to have a van full of work related 'stuff' and 90% of the time it is absolutely empty (it only ever carries a few boxes for delivery), so not suitable for everyone. Although it is suprising how little space a spare takes up.
If anyone is interested this is similar to the cover I use (mine was a bit cheaper).
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SPARE-WHEEL-CO...43ade7be84
This would also be useful for those who have their spare in the carrier, as it keeps it clean and dry.

P.S.
When lubricating the carrier bolt don't forget to check tyre pressure and condition.:thumbsup:
No point in having a flat or illegal spare.Confusedillyme:
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#7
good advice - there are a couple of flats on the head so you can just about get a spanner on it even though its in a recess - the Citroen tool itself really could do better...
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#8
The thread size is M12 x 1.5. BUT, this is a twin thread (I presume for speed) which means it has two starts at the bolt end. Standard bolts just have one. So unless you can get this type somewhere it would be easier to weld a nut on top.
I've done the same as j90xxx and carry the spare in the back.
Confusedalut:
2006 2.0hdi 600 with bench seat.  Cool
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#9
(09-07-2012, 01:42 PM)j90xxx Wrote:  Not a solution for everyone, but...
I removed the spare wheel AND carrier (just lifts out when spare wheel removed, a 10sec job and can be replaced as easily when required) because;
1. The reason in the original thread.
2. Gets covered in road dirt, etc.
3. Difficult to check pressure.
4. Not easy to see tyre condition.
The spare is now clean and dry and sits in the back of my van in its own cover. It is bungeed down for safety reasons.
I am fortunate not to have a van full of work related 'stuff' and 90% of the time it is absolutely empty (it only ever carries a few boxes for delivery), so not suitable for everyone. Although it is suprising how little space a spare takes up.
If anyone is interested this is similar to the cover I use (mine was a bit cheaper).
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SPARE-WHEEL-CO...43ade7be84
This would also be useful for those who have their spare in the carrier, as it keeps it clean and dry.

P.S.
When lubricating the carrier bolt don't forget to check tyre pressure and condition.:thumbsup:
No point in having a flat or illegal spare.Confusedillyme:

Good advice-also prevents theft/vandalism

(09-07-2012, 01:14 PM)crickleymal Wrote:  
(09-07-2012, 12:50 PM)3rensho Wrote:  Good advice indeed. I do that about every year after someone else posted about a rusted bolt.

Same here because the BX had exactly the same system and was prone to exactly the same faults. You'd think after 20 years or so they'd get it right!:brickwall:

They have eventually sorted it-the latest Mk 3's have a non-recessed hexagon headed bolt which is operated by the wheel-bolt spanner.
I use my own cross-type wheel brace which I can spin-it takes seconds to drop the carrier.:thumbsup:
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#10
Had a Volvo 340 many years ago, the spare was under the bonnet.
Excellent idea. Was always clean, easy to check condition and pressure.
Never caught on, not sure why, Volvo innovation usually does.
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