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#1
Hi there just brought a 05 Berlingo 1.6 petrol very happy with it so far but rear right suspension is very low is it shock or torsion bar or something more sinister

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#2
Hi, welcome to the forum. There's a chance it's the rear axle bearings on their way out, or it could be a torsion bar. Plenty of posts & advice on here about how to diagnose. Just search 'rear axle'.
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#3
Hi and welcome as for the suspension as our mate above says ^^^
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#4
Cheers guys will do that today is there anything else I need to look out for

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#5
(14-01-2019, 09:29 AM)dustybin1988 Wrote:  Cheers guys will do that today is there anything else I need to look out for

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There are a few problems reported with damp getting into the BSI to the right and just below the steering wheel, caused by blockages to the drain under windscreen.
[-] The following 1 user says Thank You to cancunia for this post:
  • dustybin1988
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#6
Jack it up and try to move te wheel from side to side, and also spin it.
If it's wobbly, your bearing is shot. which is a pretty easy fix, really. (You can get complete hub kits. Get a pair of them, you'll want to replace it on both sides. )

If it's the torsion bar, you'll need to replace the entire rear axle assembly.
(I understand that the torsion bars are 'pretensioned' and also, it's not all that easy to get hold of new bars)
Refurbished assemblies are available online for not too much. Ideally, you should look for one with added grease nipples, but it's not absolutely necessary.
you'll also need a new set of hubs... (The bearings aren't designed to be removed, and I haven't seen them sold separately)
The assembly's rear mounts are metal--framed rubber blocks. These may have expired, so get a new set at the same time.(They're cheap) If these have failed it'll allow the frame to pivot down if you 'catch air' on a speed bump or something.
New shocks may also be nice to install, and possibly give the spare wheel holder a good roing over with a wire brush, rust eater and Hammerrite...
In theory, the operation is:
1. Jack up car,
2. Drop the muffler and spare wheel.
3. Remove rear wheels.
4. Remove brake drums(if you have drums. some have discs)
5. rush out and buy new drums, pads and possibly other brake parts because the old parts have crapped out...
6. Remove hubs.
7. Remove brakes.
8. Unbolt the 4 mounting points of the frame. Use a jack to support it so it doesn't slam down... you'll need TORX tools. The rear mount is unbolted through a tiny hole going from the underside of the swing arm(thickness of the toolshaft is critical. ) The front mounts are also released with Torx tools, the 3 bolts holding a triangular plate to the car body. NOT the large HEX nut.
9. Drag the frame out and strip it of important bits. (shocks requires a 24mm socket and long lever arm+large unbrako and lever arm. Unless you can find the bolts somewhere online you'll need them, even if you get new shocks). The brake adjuster is held on with ordinary bolts so no issues. It may have a broken spring, or have seized, though. (If seized, WD40 and smack it with a hammer)
10. Assemble shocks, brake adjuster and brakes onto new frame. Move the front mounting plates(yes, not you can touch that nut... ) replace the rear mounts, and any bracketry I may have failed to mention...
11. Lots of swearing, and also getting the frame positioned and bolted in.
12. add hubs and brake drums.
13. Replace whatever parts are left...
14. You may want to bleed the brakes...

If you have all parts lined up, and have your tools ready you should be able to fix it on a saturday.
[-] The following 1 user says Thank You to Gadgetman for this post:
  • Art b
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#7
(14-01-2019, 01:36 PM)Gadgetman Wrote:  Jack it up and try to move te wheel from side to side, and also spin it.
If it's wobbly, your bearing is shot. which is a pretty easy fix, really. (You can get complete hub kits. Get a pair of them, you'll want to replace it on both sides. )

If it's the torsion bar, you'll need to replace the entire rear axle assembly.
(I understand that the torsion bars are 'pretensioned' and also, it's not all that easy to get hold of new bars)
Refurbished assemblies are available online for not too much. Ideally, you should look for one with added grease nipples, but it's not absolutely necessary.
you'll also need a new set of hubs... (The bearings aren't designed to be removed, and I haven't seen them sold separately)
The assembly's rear mounts are metal--framed rubber blocks. These may have expired, so get a new set at the same time.(They're cheap) If these have failed it'll allow the frame to pivot down if you 'catch air' on a speed bump or something.
New shocks may also be nice to install, and possibly give the spare wheel holder a good roing over with a wire brush, rust eater and Hammerrite...
In theory, the operation is:
1. Jack up car,
2. Drop the muffler and spare wheel.
3. Remove rear wheels.
4. Remove brake drums(if you have drums. some have discs)
5. rush out and buy new drums, pads and possibly other brake parts because the old parts have crapped out...
6. Remove hubs.
7. Remove brakes.
8. Unbolt the 4 mounting points of the frame. Use a jack to support it so it doesn't slam down... you'll need TORX tools. The rear mount is unbolted through a tiny hole going from the underside of the swing arm(thickness of the toolshaft is critical. ) The front mounts are also released with Torx tools, the 3 bolts holding a triangular plate to the car body. NOT the large HEX nut.
9. Drag the frame out and strip it of important bits. (shocks requires a 24mm socket and long lever arm+large unbrako and lever arm. Unless you can find the bolts somewhere online you'll need them, even if you get new shocks). The brake adjuster is held on with ordinary bolts so no issues. It may have a broken spring, or have seized, though. (If seized, WD40 and smack it with a hammer)
10. Assemble shocks, brake adjuster and brakes onto new frame. Move the front mounting plates(yes, not you can touch that nut... ) replace the rear mounts, and any bracketry I may have failed to mention...
11. Lots of swearing, and also getting the frame positioned and bolted in.
12. add hubs and brake drums.
13. Replace whatever parts are left...
14. You may want to bleed the brakes...

If you have all parts lined up, and have your tools ready you should be able to fix it on a saturday.
Yes I'm hoping it's just a bearing but don't want to replace the whole axle I did that on a 1993 proton due to terminal rust so know it's a tiresome job cheers for information I will look at it weekend

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#8
I think you'll find that it's not all that difficult. Unless the nuts on the brake lines have rusted solid. Then you're in for a lot of pain. (But that goes for any brand, really)

Just one thing. Whatever you do, don't even think about getting a Chinese 'pattern part' replacement rear axle. These 3rd party parts are not just more expensive than a proper refurb, but the quality... I wouldn't feel safe driving with one of those fitted...

There's several different versions of the hubs, with and without ABS, and different number of teeth on the ABS versions. Make certain to get the right ones. And that the kit includes the metal axle cap. (They come in at least 2 sizes, and the normal way to remove them is to hammer a flat screwdriver through it and pry it off)
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#9
(14-01-2019, 10:36 PM)Gadgetman Wrote:  I think you'll find that it's not all that difficult. Unless the nuts on the brake lines have rusted solid. Then you're in for a lot of pain. (But that goes for any brand, really)

Just one thing. Whatever you do, don't even think about getting a Chinese 'pattern part' replacement rear axle. These 3rd party parts are not just more expensive than a proper refurb, but the quality... I wouldn't feel safe driving with one of those fitted...

There's several different versions of the hubs, with and without ABS, and different number of teeth on the ABS versions. Make certain to get the right ones. And that the kit includes the metal axle cap. (They come in at least 2 sizes, and the normal way to remove them is to hammer a flat screwdriver through it and pry it off)
Ok thanks once I get some chance of working on the Citroen I will look into axle purchase but definitely not Chinese pattern parts which need to be avoided as usually poor quality but many thanks for advice

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